Binary Fission: Facts Check

Binary Fission: Facts Check

Binary fission is not really a cell division; rather it’s kind of an asexual reproduction technique. Binary fission happens in prokaryotes and some single celled eukaryotes, the most common example is Amoeba to begin with. Asexual reproduction is a type of reproduction where an offspring is born without the involvement of two separate sex of a species having to intercourse and go through forming gametes and all that. The number of chromosome stays same over generations unless there is some sort of mutation deep underneath their cell structure.

Facts

Here’s a few interesting fact you may like about Binary Fission.

  • Literal Meaning of Binary Fission: A method of asexual reproduction for living bodies, e.g. some prokaryotes and eukaryotes where one body splits into two with the exactly same number of chromosomes and molecular properties.
  • Which organisms use binary fission? Organisms have been divided into a plethora of domains; the ones that belong to the Bacteria and Archaea use binary fission as their primary method of reproduction. However, organelles like Amoebas are also living beings that go through binary fission.
  • Exceptions? Well, not all eukaryotes need to pick Binary Fission as their primary method of reproduction. Some Protists, unicellular Fungi etc. could even go through mitosis and ‘normally’ reproduce offspring. The opposite term to binary fission is ‘multiple fission’.

  • Are the offspring exact copies? In most cases, yes. Especially with Amoeba, the offspring bears all similar properties from the parent Amoeba. However, sometimes the surroundings might affect the reproduction resulting in mutation. For example, if there’s a nuclear explosion the amoebas in nearby areas could mutate.

Conclusion

Knowing about life sciences is fun. While the process of regular cell divisions like mitosis and meiosis are fun to know, the fact that a single celled living being like Amoeba can go through such complex asexual reproduction is quite fascinating.

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